Blog : test automation

Our first online workshop – Introduction to State Model Based Testing

Our first online workshop – Introduction to State Model Based Testing

Our instructor, Alex Rotaru, has previously organized the Introduction to State Model Based Testing (SMBT) workshop during Autumn Testing Camp and later talked about this concept during a seminar hosted by Cluj IT Cluster. The response and feedback he received after both events were very encouraging which is why we decided to make this workshop available on our platform for any software professional curious to deepen their knowledge on software testing and learn more about the process of test automation.

The concept of SMBT is introduced in both the BBST® Foundations and Test Design courses. Through this workshop, we want to go beyond theory and teach you how to apply it to different scenarios you can come across in your work as a software tester. Learn more about the important issues this workshop will help you solve.

The State Model Based workshop is a great opportunity for those who are already familiar with automation or coding. However, if you lack programming skills, you shouldn’t let this hold you back because you will work in teams and get help from your peers.

Over the course of 2 days you will practice in teams how to model, implement and automate test flows, how to randomize test execution, you will get familiar with open source tools that will help you detect weak spots in your app, and much more.

In order to make this workshop interactive, we limit the number of participants to 20, so hurry up and book your spot! Find out all the details of this workshop and register here.

5 concepts from BBST that will help you create more powerful automated tests

5 concepts from BBST that will help you create more powerful automated tests

A lot of projects and companies nowadays no longer have dedicated testers. That doesn’t mean they no longer do testing; they simply share the responsibility of testing inside a development team. Testing becomes an activity that everyone in the team does, but there’s also a strong focus on automation and trying to create large regression suites that cover as much as possible from the overall functionality of the application.

I’ve also seen automated scripts created in several contexts where the people creating them were focused on solving the programming challenges, but they seemed to overlook one key element: how to make their tests powerful. There were lots of hours involved, lots of tools and frameworks, lots of lines of code, but there was little understanding of the application and superficial interest in what the tests will find and cover. So the teams put a lot of effort in creating extensive automated test suites but the question that remained was “Do they bring enough value?”

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